Anglican Taonga

New Bishop for Waipounamu

http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/88653516/new-maori-bishop-for-the-south-island

http://anglicantaonga.org.nz/News/Tikanga-Maori/Install

 

Bishop Richard, installed
Bishop Richard Wallace was today installed as the second Bishop of Te Wai Pounamu, as the heavens declared their blessing.
3 / 9
TAONGA NEWS   |  22 JAN 2017  |
If rain is a sign of blessing – then Heaven has declared an emphatic blessing on Te Wai Pounamu’s newly ordained Bishop Richard Wallace.
Rain was falling steadily when Bishop Richard stood outside the Church of Te Hepera Pai (The Good Shepherd) in Ferry Rd, Christchurch, waiting for the putatara, or conch, to sound his arrival to be installed as the second Bishop of Te Wai Pounamu.
The home people predicted a far bigger crowd than could jam into the beautiful little punga-clad whare karakia, and they were right about that – there wasn’t a spare seat in the two marquees pitched in front of the church.
But by the time Bishop Richard was midway through his kauhau, the rain was fair bucketing down – dodge the drips if you could – and if you sat at the back you’d have struggled to hear over the rain’s racket.
No matter: the himene were old favourites, they were frequent, the singing was full of joy and gusto – and there was no mistaking the fact that you were caught up in a forcefield of aroha, given and taken.
#
No mistaking, either, that when this bishop talks about partnership, he means it.
At the start of the service, Bishop Victoria Matthews was sitting well towards the rear of the marquee.
She wasn’t sat there for long, though – because no sooner had the service begun than Bishop Richard called her up to sit alongside him in the sanctuary.
He wanted them to be bishops together, he said – and that remark drew a spontaneous burst of applause.
Bishop Richard’s emphasis on doing ministry together was clear in the chosen readings, too.
There was Numbers 11: 24-29, read by Sophie Paaka. That’s the account of the Lord sending the same Spirit that was on Moses on to the 70 elders, and of them prophesying. And of Moses’s reaction when Joshua protested about that:
“Are you jealous for my sake? I wish that all the Lord’s people were prophets and that the Lord would put his Spirit upon them all!”
Then, the chosen epistle, read by Rev Errol Anderson, of Brisbane, was I Corinthians 12-31a. Verse 21 catches the spirit there: The eye can never say to the hand: ‘I don’t need you.’ The head can’t say to the feet: ‘I don’t need you.’
And for the gospel, there was Peggy Peek reading Luke 10: 1-9, where Jesus chose 72 other disciples  and sent them ahead in pairs to all the towns he planned to visit…  and urged them to: “Heal the sick, and tell them: ‘The Kingdom of God is near you now.’”
Bishop Richard developed those themes in his kauhau:
“When I put my pledge (to serve) in, I said – and I say again to you now – that this is not for me alone.
“The Bible readings remind us that – and these are words that God gave us – that I cannot do it alone, and we will do it as a team.”
#
In his earlier life, Bishop Richard was a sergeant in the Air Force – and at Onuku Marae yesterday a contingent from the RNZAF were given significant parts to play at the start of the ordination service.
This morning, the Air Force ope was on hand again. Bishop Richard called them forward, and presented them with taonga, including a mounted piece of pounamu.
It has become clear then, that this is a bishop who is not only a team player, but a bishop who doesn’t forget the rock from which he was hewn.
#
As we said, there were two marquees pitched in front of the whare karakia.
A longer one for the congregation, and a shorter one for the clergy. Those two tents were butted together, and open one to the other.
But there was still a narrow gap between them, and if you strayed into that gap for more than a few seconds today… you’d surely get soaked.
Then again, if you looked skyward through that crack, you could see the cross that crowns Te Hepera Pai, standing high over the two tents.
It seemed symbolic, somehow, and perhaps Leonard Cohen should have the last word:
There is a crack in everything/
That’s how the light gets in.  

Bishop Richard, installed

Bishop Richard Wallace was today installed as the second Bishop of Te Wai Pounamu, as the heavens declared their blessing.

If rain is a sign of blessing – then Heaven has declared an emphatic blessing on Te Wai Pounamu’s newly ordained Bishop Richard Wallace.

Rain was falling steadily when Bishop Richard stood outside the Church of Te Hepera Pai (The Good Shepherd) in Ferry Rd, Christchurch, waiting for the putatara, or conch, to sound his arrival to be installed as the second Bishop of Te Wai Pounamu.

The home people predicted a far bigger crowd than could jam into the beautiful little punga-clad whare karakia, and they were right about that – there wasn’t a spare seat in the two marquees pitched in front of the church.

But by the time Bishop Richard was midway through his kauhau, the rain was fair bucketing down – dodge the drips if you could – and if you sat at the back you’d have struggled to hear over the rain’s racket.

No matter: the himene were old favourites, they were frequent, the singing was full of joy and gusto – and there was no mistaking the fact that you were caught up in a forcefield of aroha, given and taken.

No mistaking, either, that when this bishop talks about partnership, he means it.

At the start of the service, Bishop Victoria Matthews was sitting well towards the rear of the marquee.

She wasn’t sat there for long, though – because no sooner had the service begun than Bishop Richard called her up to sit alongside him in the sanctuary.

He wanted them to be bishops together, he said – and that remark drew a spontaneous burst of applause.

Bishop Richard’s emphasis on doing ministry together was clear in the chosen readings, too.

There was Numbers 11: 24-29, read by Sophie Paaka. That’s the account of the Lord sending the same Spirit that was on Moses on to the 70 elders, and of them prophesying. And of Moses’s reaction when Joshua protested about that:

“Are you jealous for my sake? I wish that all the Lord’s people were prophets and that the Lord would put his Spirit upon them all!”

Then, the chosen epistle, read by Rev Errol Anderson, of Brisbane, was I Corinthians 12-31a. Verse 21 catches the spirit there: The eye can never say to the hand: ‘I don’t need you.’ The head can’t say to the feet: ‘I don’t need you.’

And for the gospel, there was Peggy Peek reading Luke 10: 1-9, where Jesus chose 72 other disciples  and sent them ahead in pairs to all the towns he planned to visit…  and urged them to: “Heal the sick, and tell them: ‘The Kingdom of God is near you now.’”

Bishop Richard developed those themes in his kauhau:

“When I put my pledge (to serve) in, I said – and I say again to you now – that this is not for me alone.

“The Bible readings remind us that – and these are words that God gave us – that I cannot do it alone, and we will do it as a team.”

In his earlier life, Bishop Richard was a sergeant in the Air Force – and at Onuku Marae yesterday a contingent from the RNZAF were given significant parts to play at the start of the ordination service.

This morning, the Air Force ope was on hand again. Bishop Richard called them forward, and presented them with taonga, including a mounted piece of pounamu.

It has become clear then, that this is a bishop who is not only a team player, but a bishop who doesn’t forget the rock from which he was hewn.

As we said, there were two marquees pitched in front of the whare karakia.

A longer one for the congregation, and a shorter one for the clergy. Those two tents were butted together, and open one to the other.

But there was still a narrow gap between them, and if you strayed into that gap for more than a few seconds today… you’d surely get soaked.

Then again, if you looked skyward through that crack, you could see the cross that crowns Te Hepera Pai, standing high over the two tents.

It seemed symbolic, somehow, and perhaps Leonard Cohen should have the last word:

There is a crack in everything/

That’s how the light gets in.  

 

Koinoinia KiwiSaver Scheme

Ethical KiwiSaver

There has recently been significant media interest in ethical investment issues – in particular, coverage about KiwiSaver Schemes investing in munitions manufacturers.

Mark Wilcox, General Manager of the NZ Anglican Church Pension Board, was recently interviewed on Radio Rhema on the subject of ethical investment. The Koinonia KiwiSaver Scheme, which the Pension Board administers, provides Christians with an opportunity to invest in a KiwiSaver scheme that is founded on ethical and responsible investment principles that reflect Christian values.

Mark discusses what makes Koinonia different from other KiwiSaver schemes, the Pension Board’s investment philosophy, financial stewardship, the challenges of ethical investment and the importance of starting a savings plan early. The full interview can be found atkoinonia.org.nz/misc/JPKiwiSaverEthicalInvestment.mp3

Note also that Mark speaks about fossil fuel divestment in the latest Anglican Taonga magazine. You can learn more about Koinonia atwww.koinonia.org.nz.

Thanks for your support,
Mark Wilcox
General Manager
The New Zealand Anglican Church Pension Board
PO Box 12-287, Thorndon, Wellington 6144
Phone: 04 473 9369
Cell: 027 234 3792
Email: mark.wilcox@acpb.org.nz
Web: www.acpb.org.nz

 Ethical investments for the Christian community

Te Waipounamu Graduation Celebration 2016

16 January 2016 

Te Whare Wananga o Te Waipounamu under the leadership of Bishop John Gray set the high level platform for people in Ministry to study Christian education using a blended model of whanau-based, plus flexible, learning options in an environment that modelled Aroha and Manaakitanga.

 This model of learning came to fruition on the 16th January 2016 when 23 of the 36 students present graduated. This was the long awaited reward for the hard work of the students and our tutors.

 Students from Te Tai Tokerau Northland/Auckland, Te Upoko o Te Ika(Wellington) and Te Waipounamu came together to receive their certificates from Bishop Te Kitohi Pikaahu, who had ecclesiastic oversight for The Maori Diocese o Te Waipounamu after Bishop John Gray’ passed away (Haere, haere, haere atu ra Pihopa).

 The day began with a Thanksgiving Service led by the Rev Kararaina Field. After the powhiri and welcome of the graduates, we were given some words of wisdom by our guest speaker Marama Parore, General Manager of Te Rau Matatini, who spoke about Maori excellence, and our uniqueness. Archdeacon Micky Thompson pointed out to his fellow graduates the importance of whakapapa and nga moemoea.

Susan Wallace introduced Te kaupapa o Te Ra and Rev Sarah McGregor, our Kaihautu/Ministry Educator for Te Whare Wananga, did the introductions. She said, “it was a great feeling seeing the students.” Some of whom she had met for the first time on Saturday (as most of the students travelled from a distance for their ceremony) coming through to graduate. "I love seeing people succeed."

What was so significant about this graduation is that kaumatua in their 80s and rangatahi in their 20s-30s, as well as some in-betweens, had studied over several years and this was a huge achievement (Nga Mahi Pai o Te Atua). Those who had entered into Gods Kingdom were given special mentions and their awards were collected by Whanau. The support for the graduates came in blessings from their whanau o Te Karaiti as well as their whakapapa whanau.

Each student received with their certificates flowers and a pounamu taonga that was authenticated by Kai-tahu pounamu.

Several photographs were taken on the day of students and their whanau, groups and selfies. These are with Te Whare Wananga o Te Waipounamu and can be sourced from them.

People within the various ministry teams in Aotearoa who want to learn in this unique type of environment are welcome to make enquires. If you are prepared to work within your church, communities and whanau in pastoral care and learn about theological practices, ‘Naumai, haere mai.’ Enrol on our awesome courses and become a graduate like us. Contact Rev Sarah McGregor (kaihautu@waipounamu.org.nz) for more details or visit our website at www.waipounamu.org.nz.

He Aha te Mea nui O Tenei Ao. He Tangata, He Tangata, He Tangata

Te Waipounamu Graduates 2016


 L-R Back: George Ehau, Wyn Ehau, Nancy Tauwhare (for Te Hira Tauwhare), Bill Nathan, Te Hope Hakaraia, Richard Wallace, Rita Biddle
L-R Centre: Mere Wallace, Lorraine Warena, Paremoeone Paku, Rahab Brown, Andy Joseph, Kararaina Field, Gaylene Stevens (past Kaihautu), Lynnore Pikaahu
L-R Front: Jill Karetai, Bishop Te Kitohi Pikaahu, Sarah McGregor (Kaihautu), Peggy Peek
(Not all Graduates were present in this photo)

Graduates from Te Whare Wananga o Te Waipounamu in Christchurch:

Certificate in Awhi Whānau 
Rita Biddle
Rahab Brown
Stacey Hakaraia
Sonia Houia
Andrew Joseph
Jill Karetai
Tu Kepa
Tremain Mikaere
Paremoeone Paku
Peggy Peek
Paula Puha
Putiputi Thompson
Eliza Tobin (Posthumous) – received by her daughter
Lorraine Warena

Licentiate in Practical Ministry 
Richard Wallace
George Ehau
Winifred Ehau
Peggy Peek
Ani Denham (posthumous)
Mere Wallace

Certificate in Practical Ministry 
Taylor Materoa
Thomas Moore
Te Hira Tauwhare (posthumous) – received by Rev Nancy Tauwhare

Advance Certificate in Manaaki Hauora 
Kararaina Field
Te Hope Hakaraia
Paul Kahukura
William Nathan
Peggy Peek
Kelly Tipene (posthumous) – received by his daughters
Nani Wiki
Rapiata Hokianga
Moana Knight
George Ehau
Lynnore Pikaahu

 Bishop John Gray laid to rest

TAONGA NEWS   |  18 NOV 2015  |

The Rt Rev John Gray, first Bishop of Te Hui Amorangi o Te Waipounamu, has been buried at Tokomaru Bay, heartland of Ngati Porou.

About 130 mourners turned up to his funeral service at Pakirikiri Marae, a stone’s throw from the water’s edge at Tokomaru Bay on the East Coast of the North Island.

Bishop John, who had Ngati Porou ties, was then taken through the town to Tuatini urupa, which abuts the historic St Mary’s Church, Tokomaru Bay.

John Robert Kuru Gray was born in 1947, ordained as a deacon in 1982, as a Priest in 1983, and as a bishop in 1996.

He served as Vicar General to Te Pihopa o Aotearoa for 10 years and, in the words of Archbishop Brown Turei, “his ministry and courageous leadership within Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa and the wider Three-Tikanga Church will be sorely missed.”

Bishop John leaves behind his wife Helen, son Robert, daughters Raquel and Rawinia, his mokopuna and extended family.

The next issue of Taonga  magazine – which is about to go to print – will include a brief maimai aroha piece on Bishop John.

In the meantime, we have prepared a photo essay on the day’s events for this website.


 

Archbishop Brown Turei Pays Tribute To Bishop John Gray

The Bishop of Te Hui Amorangi o Te Waipounamu, the Rt Rev John Gray, has died in Christchurch, surrounded by his family.

TAONGA NEWS   |  13 NOV 2015  | 

The Bishop of Te Hui Amorangi o Te Waipounamu, the Rt Rev John Gray, has died in Christchurch after a long illness.

Bishop Gray is lying at Te Hepara Pai, Philipstown, this weekend. He will then be taken to Tokomaru Bay, on the East Coast,. for the tangi.

Te Ohanga o Te Pīhopatanga o Aotearoa , the Most Rev Brown Turei, has issued the following statement:

E te Whānau a te Karaiti, 

Kua tae noa mai te karere pōuri mō te matenga a Pīhopa John Robert Kuru Gray i tē ata nei o Paraire 13 Noema 2015.

Nō reira e te rangatira e John, haere, haere, haere. Kia tapu hoki koe nā Te Karaiti. Whakatūria tō tira hei Ngāpunarua. Tahuri ō mata ngā kohu tapui kei runga o te Kautuku. Haere koe i runga i te reo karanga o Te Wairua Tapu e pōwhiri nei ki a koe.

Haere koe ki tua i te arai, piki atu i ngā uru karaka o te Ariuru. Mau atu i ngā taonga a Wharawhara, te Paekura ki tō taringa, te Waikanae ki tō ringa, hei tohu mōu. Haere ki te okiokinga o Te Karaiti, moe mai rā i runga i te rangimārie.

It is with great sorrow that I write to inform you all that Bishop John Gray, the Bishop of Te Hui Amorangi o Te Waipounamu, passed away this morning. He passed peacefully and surrounded by his loved ones. 

Bishop John was born in 1947, ordained as a Deacon in 1982, as a Priest in 1983, and as a Bishop in 1996.

He served as Vicar General to Te Pīhopa o Aotearoa for 10 years, and his ministry and courageous leadership within Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa and the wider Three-Tikanga Church will be sorely missed. 

Bishop John leaves behind his beloved wife Helen, his son Robert, daughters Raquel and Rawinia, his mokopuna and extended family.

I humbly ask that each of you would uphold his family, and Te Hui Amorangi o Te Waipounamu, in prayer at this sad time. 

At this time we are awaiting confirmation of the funeral arrangements from the whānau. This will be circulated once it is received. 

Again, I ask that at this time our focus, as Bishop John's family in Christ, be on our prayer for him and for his immediate family.

Ngā Manaakitanga ki a tātou.

++Brown

May Bishop John Gray rest in peace and rise in glory


Bishop John Gray suspended

Bishop John Gray has been suspended from his office as Bishop of the Maori Anglican Diocese of Te Waipounamu.

Taonga News   |  25 Feb 2015

The Archbishops of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia are aware of complaints made recently about Bishop John Gray.

The Archbishops – Brown Turei, Philip Richardson, and Winston Halapua – have advised that Bishop John will not hold office as Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Te Waipounamu while these complaints  are being investigated.  (The Diocese of Te Waipounamu covers the South Island).

Archbishop Brown has appointed the Vicar General of Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa, the Rt Rev Te Kitohi Pikaahu, to provide care and leadership of the Diocese of Te Waipounamu in the meantime.

(NOTE: Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa is the Maori Anglican Church of Aotearoa. Bishop John retains the title of bishop throughout the investigation. However, he cannot exercise ministry until the matter is resolved.)

Media inquiries:
Rev’d Jayson Rhodes

021 661319
communications@anglicanchurch.org.nz

http://anglicantaonga.org.nz/